Tuzigoot National Monument

Tuzigoot National Monument is a former 110-room pueblo constructed in the 12th century and perched on a ridge about 120 feet above the Verde River Valley.  Built by the Southern Sinaguans, the residents probably used water from the Verde River to irrigate their farms, much like farmers do today.  It was excavated in 1933, by the Civil Works Administration who also built the work house, now used as museum to house, protect and interpret what lay hidden for so many centuries.  Perhaps the best view waits to be savored from the rooftop of the tower of “Tuzigoot”, an Apache word for crooked water, referring to the nearby oxbow-shaped historic river bed.  We have a short trail, steep in places, and approximate ¼ mile long plus a small gift store.

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Location

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Nearby
Latitude: 34.770401 Longitude: -112.027127 Elevation: 3403 ft
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National Park Service

Recreational Opportunities

Tavasci Marsh, located at Tuzigoot National Monument is a popular destination for birding and other wildlife viewing. 

Fees

$10 entrance fee includes entrance into both Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot National Monuments for up to 7 days. A 12-month park pass for entrance to both parks is available for $30. Other Federal Passes are also available.

ADA Accessibility Notes

The museum and restrooms are wheel-chair accessible.  The interpretive trail leading through the hilltop pueblo is steep in places, and caution should be used.  

Pet Friendly Notes

Pets on a leash 6-feet or shorter are allowed on trail. We do not recommend that pets be left in unattended vehicles while owners are on trail due to the potential for extreme temperatures in the area.

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